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  • Taming defects in nanoporous materials to put them to a good use

    News R , 9th Aug 2018

    The word "defect" universally evokes some negative, undesirable feature, but researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University have a different opinion: in the realm of nanoporous materials, defects can be put to a good use, if one knows how to tame them.

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  • Taming defects in nanoporous materials to put them to a good use

    Bio Fuel Daily , 9th Aug 2018

    ESRI Director, Professor Andrew Barron is co-author of the work, said: "In ESRI, our research efforts are focused on making an impact on the way we produce energy, making it clean, safe and affordable. However, we are well aware that progress in applied research is only possible through a deep understanding of fundamentals. This work goes exactly in that direction."

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  • "Defective" Material Could Capture Unwanted CO2

    Technology Networks , 9th Aug 2018

    The word “defect” universally evokes some negative, undesirable feature, but researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University have a different opinion: in the realm of nanoporous materials, defects can be put to a good use, if one knows how to tame them.

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  • Taming defects in nanoporous materials to put them to a good use

    EurekAlert! The Global Source for Science News , 8th Aug 2018

    A team led by Dr Marco Taddei, Marie Sklodowska-Curie Actions Fellow at Swansea University, is investigating how the properties of metal-organic frameworks, a class of materials resembling microscopic sponges, can be adjusted by taking advantage of their defects to make them better at capturing CO2.

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  • Taming defects in nanoporous materials to put them to a good use

    Phys.org , 8th Aug 2018

    Modification of defective nanoporous materials has unique effects on their properties. Swansea University scientists are seeking to master this method to make new materials to capture CO2.

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